image

Louis Killen: Discography — Anthologies
Miscellaneous Unique "Live" Tracks


Folksound of Britain
image 
  • Folksound of Britain
    • 1965 - EMI/HMV CLP 1910 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. Overture: Three Irish Polkas — The Rakes
    2. The Verdant Braes Of Screne — The McPeakes
    3. Chevy Chase; The Waters Of Tyne — Jack Armstrong & Patricia Jennings (Northumbrian Small Pipe Duet)
    4. Derwentwater's Farewell Louis Killen
    5. The College Valley Hunt (Rogerson) — Louis Killen
    6. The White Cockade — Bob Davenport with The Rakes
    7. The Banks Of The Dee — Jack Elliott
    8. Jowl & Listen Lad — Jack Elliott
  • Side Two
    1. Three Whiskies (Trad., Coll. & Arr. Shaw) — The Countryside Players
    2. Kissin' In The Dark — Dave Campbell
    3. The Broken Token — Winnie Campbell
    4. The Ploughboy — The Watersons
    5. The Wedding Song — Bob & John Copper
    6. The Three Huntsmen — Cyril Tawney
    7. Young Rambleway — Cyril Tawney
    8. How Pleasant & Delightful — Charlie Bate (with Accordion)
    9. The Padstow May Song — The Hobby Horse Party

  • Credits
    • Recorded live during the concert presented by the English Folk, Dance and Song Society at the Royal Festival Hall, London on June 4, 1965
    • Produced by Roy Guest
    • Recorded by Sean Davies
    • Edited by Peter Kennedy
    • Introduced by Dominic Behan
    • All tracks Trad., unless otherwise noted.

Sleeve Notes

Promoters of public concerts of traditional folk music have a great responsibility. The music itself does not seem designed for performance in concert halls. Many folk music concerts have, therefore, tended to present either the "voice beautiful" style of folk music, aimed at classical music audiences, or a "teen-beat" show little removed from pop music and aimed basically at a pop music audience.

The fact is that folk music has its own styles and terms of reference. The intention of the concert at the Royal Festival Hall was to present a panorama of some of those styles. Many singers and many regions had to be omitted from the concert, but if this record encourages listeners to explore further, it will help to give them a wider knowledge of their own traditional music.

ROY GUEST


BOB DAVENPORT AND THE RAKES These four young men are motivated by love and respect for the music, social attitudes and basic dignity contained in the tradition. They now have some recognition in the Folk Music movement, but they are still happiest singing and playing in company with the fine traditional performers, who have been and still are, their inspiration.

The Rakes got together in 1956. They served an exciting apprenticeship under Michael Gorman, the Sligo fiddler, and now form part of the Four Court Ceilidhe Band. Reg Hall has learnt from many English country musicians and owes a great deal to the West Hoathly Band and the Padstow Blue Ribbon Band. The Rakes are essentially a dance band, but have played along with Bob Davenport for about seven years.

THE McPEAKE FAMILY (Francis senior, Frank, James, Francis and Kathleen) come from Belfast, Northern Ireland and are one of the most well-known traditional folk music families.

JACK ARMSTRONG started playing in 1926 and founded the Barnstormers dance band, became piper to the Duke of Northumberland. Invited by Burl Ives to Hollywood where he stayed for ten weeks. "I am much too old to appear now but hate the idea of giving up. I have had a really wonderful life with this kind of music".

PATRICIA JENNINGS Born and bred in the heart of the Borderland, comes of a family where music, song and dance have always been to the fore. She heard and loved the Small Pipes when a child and had her first set at the age of 15. Only in the last two years, since her children are grown, has she been able to throw her energies into playing, as she now does, with Jack Armstrong.

LOUIS KILLEN From Gateshead-on-Tyne, he is one of the most well-known singers of the folk song revival and was a founder-member of Folk Song and Ballad, Newcastle, one of Britain's first folk song clubs concerned with traditional folk music.

JACK ELLIOTT "I was born of a mining father. My grandfather was a miner at eight years of age in 1836, naturally I am concerned with the traditional mining songs which I became interested in when I was about 10 years old. I am now 58 years old, retired from mining six weeks ago through a spinal injury. I was born in this mining village and I can't see me moving now. I've done every job in the pit bar the manager's and that's that".

THE COUNTRYSIDE PLAYERS The idea of a "Music of the Countryside" Concert was inspired by a holiday in Shetland and was first tried about 15 years ago in a village hall in Dorset with great success. Nan Fleming-Williams and Pat Shaw were both in the original group and Denis Smith joined them about six years ago to form the Countryside Players as they are today. They have specialised in the traditional music of the British Isles, though their repertoire also includes items from much further afield. In performance they aim at combining the spirit and vitality of the original tradition with a modern presentation.

DAVE, BETTY AND WINNIE CAMPBELL Dave and Betty Campbell were both born and brought up in Aberdeen. Dave's father worked "in the fish" and as a child Dave travelled extensively with him around Scotland and the islands, hearing the songs and legends of the fishing tradition. Later, as a young man, he went to work on an Aberdeenshire farm, and learnt songs of the bothy tradition. He married Betty, whose background was more rooted in the music hall traditions still current in Aberdeen. They have five children, of whom the eldest three, Ian, Winnie and Lorna, sing. The family moved down to Birmingham in the late forties.

THE WATERSON FAMILY comprises Norma, Michael and Elain, with their second cousin John Harrison. They come from Hull and the three, orphaned early, were brought up by their grandmother, a secondhand dealer. They're partly of Irish gipsy descent. Like thousands of others they came to folk song through an early interest in jazz and skiffle. They formed a group called The Mariners and played for a while in a coffee house. Then, as their style became progressively less "popped-up", more serious, they decided to start a folk song club. At present they're singing to capacity houses on Sunday nights in the largest available pub room in Hull, at the "Bluebell". They have a wide repertory but their abiding interest is in the songs and customs of their native East Yorkshire.

THE COPPER FANHLY The Copper family has lived in and around the village of Rottingdean in Sussex for over three hundred years. Working, until the last two generations, as shepherds and carters on the downland farms around the village. "With the disappearance of farming on anything like its former scale in the area Ron and I both turned to the licensing trade in which we are both still engaged". With the appearance of John the family's association with the E.F.D.S.S. moves into the fourth generation. His great-grandfather, James — with his brother Tom — were made honorary founder members for their contribution of Sussex songs in 1898.

CYRIL TAWNEY was born into a Royal Navy family at Gosport, Hants., October 12th, 1930, At the age of 16 he commenced serving twelve years in the Royal Navy and the Submarine service. He has written many songs and has recently taken a lease on the old Guildhall in Plymouth which he is turning into a folk centre for the West Country.

CHARLIE BATE is Cornish born and bred and comes from a family of traditional singers and musicians. His accordion playing and singing have long been very well known in the whole of the county and elsewhere. He is a very well-known personality to many people throughout the country in particular with his renderings of the May Song on "Obby Oss Day" also through festivals, broadcasts and recordings.

DOMINIC BEHAN comes from a famous Irish family. He is singer, song writer, poet, writer and playwright.

ROY GUEST


THE McPEAKES recorded by kind permission of Fontana Records THE WATERSONS recorded by kind permission of Topic Records.

Top Index

Welcome to Caffe Lena
image 
  • Welcome to Caffe Lena
    • 1972 - Biograph BLP-12046 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. Lena, Won't You Open Your Door — Michael Cooney
    2. Cluck Old Hen — Bill Vanaver
    3. Elegant Hobo — Paul Geremia
    4. Belles of Cheyenne/The Blackbird — Bob and Evelyne Blers
    5. The Blacksmith — Louis Killen
    6. The Clog Hornpipe/Harvest Home — High Level Ranters
  • Side Two
    1. Come On Friend — Rosalie Sorrels
    2. Giovani Montini, the Pope — Patrick Sky
    3. Blue Birds Singing in the Blue Ridge Mountains — Bottle Hill
    4. The Whore's Lament — Hedy West
    5. Daddy, What's a Train? — Bruce Phillips
    6. Sweet Little Cade in a Square — Lena Spencer
    7. Tarry Not — Frank Wakefield

  • Credits
    • Recorded live at Caffe Lena, Phila St., Saratoga N.Y., by the Bottom Forty Recording Company
    • Engineered by Phil Spence
    • Produced by Andy and Phil Spence
    • Mastered by David Hancock
    • Executive producer: Arnold S. Caplin

Top Index

The Audience Pleased:
Oberlin College Folk Music Club - Live Recordings 1959-1975
image 
  • The Audience Pleased
    • 1976 - OCF-42-756 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. East Virginia — Pete Seeger (Finney Chapel, 1959)
    2. My Name is Morgan (But It Ain't J.P.) — The Highwoods Stringband (Wilder Main, 3/30/75)
    3. One Morning in May — John Roberts and Tony Barrand (Wilder Main, 10/74)
    4. There Ain't No Bugs on Me — The New Lost City Ramblers (Wilder Main, 1959)
    5. Sheebag and Sheemore/The Boys of Twenty-five/The Chaterin' Magpie — The Boys of the Lough (Wilder Main, Spring, 1974)
    6. Angeline the Baker — Art Rosenbaum (Wilder Main, 10/11/75)
    7. Daniel Prayed — Tommy Thompson and Jim Watson of the Red Clay Ramblers (Wilder Main, 11/7/75)
  • Side Two
    1. Cumberland Blues — Highwoods Stringband (Wilder Main, 3/30/75)
    2. Staines Morris — John Roberts & Tony Barrand (Wilder Main, 10/74)
    3. 12 Gates to the City — Pete Seeger (Finney Chapel, 1959)
    4. Medley of Shetland Reels — The Boys of the Lough (Wilder Main, Spring 1974)
    5. How Mountain Gals Can Love — Stanley Brothers (Wilder Main, 1962)
    6. Barley Mow Lou and Sally Killen (Wilder Main, 9/14/74)
    7. Rye Straw/Balleydesmond Polka — Red Clay Ramblers (Wilder Main, 11/7/75)

  • Credits
    • Produced by the Oberlin Folk Music Club in co-operation with Student Union
    • Eric Brooks and Richard Carlin Co-Presidents
    • Selections by Richard Carlin
    • Front Cover: "The Audience Pleased", Honore Daumier Lithograph, 1864
    • Photography: Robert H. Stillwell
    • Thanks to: Clark Drummond & Jay Yutzey
    • The Mudd A-V Department, high atop Seeley G. Mudd Learning Center
    • Recorded live at Oberlin, 1959-1975
    • Production Coordination by Century Advent Recording

Sleeve Notes

PERFORMERS

Pete Seeger has performed at Oberlin innumerable times since he began his solo career in the early fifties. He often performed in the basement of dorms and in other informal situations, for as much money as could be collected by passing a hat. These recordings were made in 1959 in Finney Chapel, where Seeger most recently performed last May. Pete Seeger has recorded hundreds of records, mostly for Folkways and Columbia.

The Highwoods Stringband are an excellent old-time group, now established in upstate New York, although originally mostly from California. They perform in a style reminiscent of the Skillet tickers, a band from Georgia who recorded in the late twenties and early thirties. The band consists of Walt Koken and Bob Potts, fiddles, Mac Benford, banjo, Doug Dorschug, guitar and vocals, and Jenny Cleland, bass. They have recorded two records for Rounder records.

John Roberts and Tony Barrand have given two very fine concerts for us over the last few years, performing old English ballads and songs, along with a vast repertoire of music hall songs. On Staines Morris, Tony plays a bowed psaltery, a small stringed instrument that is many centuries old. They have recorded for Swallowtail and Front Hall records.

The New Lost City Ramblers are one of the pioneer stringjbands, who started performing in the late fifties. The band still occasionally performs, and each of its members, Mike Seeger (fiddle and vocal), Tom Paley (banjo), and John Cohen (guitar) have become famous on their own as folklorists and performers in various capacities. This group is largely responsible for the old-time music revival. They have recorded many albums for Folkways.

The Boys of the Lough are one of the best revival groups from Britain, and they will be performing at Oberlin again this April. The members of the band are Aly Bain (fiddle) of Shetland, Cathal McConnell (flute, penny whistle) and Robin Morton (concertina, Bodhrán (frame-drum) of Ireland and Dave Richardson of Northumbria (Northern England). Their music is a synthesis of the different regional dance musics found in No. England, Shetland, and Ireland. They have recorded for Leader/Trailer (in England), and their recordings are available in this country on Rounder and Philo labels.

Art Rosenbaum is a banjo and fiddle player, artist, and folklorist, who currently lives in Iowa, although is originally from the East. He gave a memorable concert of dance songs and ballads here last October. He has edited with Pat Dunford a fine record of Indiana songs and tunes for Folkways (Fine Times at Our House) and has most recently recorded for Meadowlands and Kicking Mule records.

The Red Clay Ramblers are a song and tune band from the Durham, North Carolina area. They were recently featured in an off-broadway musical, Diamond Studs, and have recorded for Folkways and Flying Fish records. Their members of the band are Tommy Thompson (banjo). Bill Hicks (fiddle), Jim Watson (mandolin, guitar), and Mike Craver (piano, guitar). Their arrangements of many sentimental and blues and early jazz songs were greatly appreciated by the Oberlin audience, as well as their fine arrangements of traditional and not-so-traditional dance tunes.

The Stanley Brothers are one of the best of the transitional bands, whose members were raised on old-time songs and tunes, and then became important performers of bluegrass music. Ralph Stanley, the group's banjoist, is one of the creators of bluegrass banjo picking, and Carter Stanley, his brother, has one of the most famous voices in bluegrass, surpassed only by Bill Monroe. Ralph Stanley continues to perform today with the Clinch Mountains Boys. Carter Stanley died in 1967. They have recorded for Starday and King records.

Lou and Sally Killen opened last year's concert program with a very enjoyable program of English songs. Lou's concertina playing has been quite influential to many of us over the years. The Barley Mow is a great old drinking song. The Killens have recorded for Front Hall records, and Louis Killen has made many solo albums as well for Topic and several other labels.


Since the early fifties, The Oberlin Folk Music Club has been bringing traditional performers to the school to spread folk music and lore. We've never been a stable organization; at first, our concerts were held in basements of now-forgotten spots like Pyle Inn, and the club itself was more or less a loose band of radicals and folk enthusiasts. In the mid-fifties and early sixties, when people like Pete Seeger were blacklisted for alleged communistic sympathies, Oberlin was the only school or club west of New York that consistently hired Seeger, or, in fact, that would hire him at all. Other traditional performers who played here were Jean Ritchie, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGee, Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, the New Lost City Ramblers, and Guy Carawan. The sound quality on these older tapes is a little uneven, but we thought it was important to include a few songs from the early concerts, including two songs from Pete Seeger's concert here in 1959.

After a number of years in the mid-sixties of rather sporadic activity, the club has recently revived a regular concert series, sponsoring six or seven traditional concerts a year. Thanks to the efforts of David Winston, the club has brought many of the fine performers who you will hear on this record, and continues to sponsor concerts and workshops. In editing this record, I have tried to maintain the atmosphere of the concerts themselves, by preserving introductory commentary on most of the selections, and, as much as possible, audience reaction. We hope this record will inspire memories of good times gone by, and also introduce those of you who missed some of our concerts to the fine performers who have played here over the years.

Top Index

The Philadelphia Folk Festival
image 
  • The Philadelphia Folk Festival
    • 1978 - Flying Fish FF-064 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. Scots Piping — Bruce Martin
    2. Did You Hear John Hurt? (Paxton); - Tom Paxton
    3. Jerusalem Ridge (Monroe); - Norman Blake
    4. Lady Isabel and The Elf Knight — Michael Cooney
    5. Irish Dance Medley : The Boys Of Bailisodaire/The Longford Collector (M. Coleman); - De Danann
    6. Then Came The Children (Seibel); - Kate Wolf
    7. Step It Up And Go — John Jackson
    8. I Gotta Be Me (Odetta); - Odetta
  • Side Two
    1. Green, Green Rocky Road — Dave Van Ronk
    2. All For Me Grog — Louis Killen
    3. Wild Goose Chase — Roger Sprung, Hal Wylie & The Progressive Bluegrassers
    4. A Little Piece Of Wang (Lloyd) - Debbie McClatchy
    5. The Glory Of Love (Gershwin) - Lew London Trio
    6. Dance All Night — Highwood String Band & The Green Grass Cloggers

  • Credits
    • Produced by Gene Shay
    • Recorded at the Old Poole Farm, Upper Salford, PA., August 26, 27, 28, 1977
    • Recorded by Sound Advice, Philadelphia
    • Mixing: Joel Fein and Steve Tose
    • Mastered at Acme Recording Studio, Chicago
    • Engineer: Mchael Rasfeld
    • Cover design: Steve Williams
    • Photography: Daniel Miles Kron
    • The Philadelphia Folk Festival 1977
      • Festival Chairman: Ellis Hershman
      • Programming: Teresa Pyott
    • The Philadelphia Folk Festival is sponsored and produced by The Philadelphia Folksong Society, a non-profit educational corporation.
    • The producer wishes to thank the following recording companies for their kind cooperation: Arhoolie, The Decca Record Co. Ltd., Front Hall, Owl, Philo, Rounder, Vanguard, Shanachie
    • Special thanks: Bruce Kaplan, Teresa Pyott, Mick Maloney, Neece Lamey, Andy Braunfeld and Fred Oster Vintage Intruments

Sleeve Notes

This is the first album of the Philadelphia Folk Festival to be released since 1961, the year the Festival began. On it you 11 hear highlights of the 1977 Festival evening concerts. Outstanding performances yes, but a mere sampling of the many talented musicians, singers, songwriters, dancers and story tellers who turn these annual get-togethers into something very special.

To them and to the countless Festival volunteers—from seasoned, headquarters staffers to the kids working in parking—this album is dedicated.

Ken Goldstein produced The Philadelphia Folk Festival Vols. 1 and 2 for Prestige Records. Both albums are now out-of-print.

Top Index

An Evening at the English Music Hall
image 
  • An Evening at the English Music Hall
    • 1984 - Front Hall FHR-030 LP

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Side One
    1. A Bit Of Cucumber (T.W. Connor)
    2. Don't Have Any More Mrs.Moore
    3. My Old Dutch (C. Ingle)
    4. Lily Of Laguna (L. Stuart)
    5. Sweeney Todd The Barber (R.P. Weston)
  • Side Two
    1. Last Neet
    2. Sam Hall (Traditional)
    3. WhenI Take My Morning Promenade (Traditional)
    4. I'm Shy, Mary Ellen, I'm Shy (C. Ridgewell, G. Stevens)
    5. The Old Armchair (Traditional)

  • Musicians
    • Tony Barrand: Vocals (Tracks: 5, 9)
    • Murray Callahan: Vocals (Tracks: 8)
    • Andra Herzbrun Barrand: Vocals (Tracks: 4)
    • David Jones: Vocals (Tracks: 3, 7, 10)
    • Louis Killen: Vocals (Tracks: 6)
    • Maggi Pierce: Vocals (Tracks: 2)
    • John Roberts: Vocals (Tracks: 1)
    • Jan Oosting: Piano
  • Credits
    • Producer: Bill Spence, Tony Barrand
    • Recorded at Troy Music Hall, Troy, NY, April 6, 1974.
    • Engineer: Bill Spence
    • Cover Design: Jon Henry
    • Liner Notes: Tony Barrand
    • Front Cover Photography: James Collins
    • Rear Cover Photography: James Collins, Julie Snow, Robert H.Todd, Jr.
    • Assistant Production Manager: Andy Spence
    • Typography: Unicomp

Top Index

The Revels: Homeward Bound
image 
  • The Revels: Homeward Bound
    • 2002 - Revels REV3 CD

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Track List:
    1. Roll Down — John Roberts with The Revels Chorus
    2. Can't You Dance the Polka? — The Revels Chorus and Band
    3. Threescore and Ten — The Revels Chorus: Tony Barrand, John Roberts, Louis Killen
    4. The Maid on the Shore — Jamie Jaffe with Bill Smith, mandolin
    5. Ocean — The Revels Chorus
    6. The Leaving of Liverpool — Louis Killen with The Revels Chorus and Band
    7. Here's a Health to the Company — David Coffin with The Revels Chorus
    8. Drake's Drum — John Roberts and Tony Barrand with Tom Pixton, accordian
    9. Run the Riggin' Again — Alsion Kelley with The Revels Women
    10. Noah's Ark — John Rockwell with The Revels Chorus
    11. The Herring's Head — The Revels Children and Chorus
    12. The Fish of the Sea/Yea Ho, Little Fish — The Revels Children with Brandon Seabrook, guitar
    13. South Wind/Jefferson and Liberty/Opera Reel — The Revels Band
    14. Euroclydon — The Revels Chorus
    15. Adieu, Sweet Lovely Nancy — Louis Killen, John Roberts and Tony Barrand
    16. Boston — David Jones with The Revels Chorus
    17. Blood-Red Roses — Louis Killen with The Revels Men
    18. Anchor Song — John Roberts & Tony Barrand
    19. Lady Franklin's Lament — David Jones
    20. The Last Leviathan — Louis Killen with Tom Pixton, acordian, and Andy Blickenderfer, double bass
    21. Rolling Down to Old Maui — David Coffin and The Revels Men
    22. The Jamestown Homeward Bound — David Jones with The Revels Chorus and Band
    23. Rolling Home to Old New England — The Revels Company

  • Musicians
    • Soloists: David Coffin, Jamie Jaffe, John Roberts, John Rockwell, Louis Killen, Tony Barrand
    • Chanteymen: David Coffin, David Jones, Louis Killen
    • Alto Vocals: Hannah Emlen, Jamie Jaffe, Wendy Loomis
    • Bass Vocals: Adrian Nussdorfer, Dónald A. Duncan, Jack McCreless, Raynor Warner, Steve Solomon
    • Soprano Vocals: Georgia Bill, Sarah Higginbotham
    • Tenor Vocals: Jim Congo, John Rockwell, Mac Howland, Tom Pixton
    • Choir Chorus: Adrian Nussdorfer, Aidin Carey, Bill Hamilton, Holly Teichholz, Isabel Yalouris, Jamie Jaffe, Jim Congo, Katherine Bryant, Kathie Fiveash, Laura Olivier, Lillian Torrey, Lily Kruskal, Lynne Beasley, Lynne Dichter, Mac Howland, Maura Burns, Michael Lane, Nat Coolidge, Peter Hamlin, Rachael Solomon, Shippen Page, Thomas Moussin
    • Bill Smith: Banjo, Mandolin
    • Brandon Seabrook: Guitar
    • David Coffin: Penny Whistle & Recorder
    • Ted Davis: Guitar
    • Tom Pixton: Accordion
  • Credits
    • Producer, Director & Arranger: George Emlen
    • Arranger: Jermone Epstein
    • Recorded at The Sonic Temple, Roslindale, MA by David Griesinger
      • Track :11 — Recorded at Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA by John Newton and Bill Winn
      • Track :12 — Recorded at St. John's Church, Watertown, MA by Frank Cunningham
    • Art Director: Sue Ladr
    • Liner Notes: George Emlen, Tony Barrand and Jack McCreless
    • Cover Painting: Brig Nancy Ann of Salem Leaving Naples, Michele Corné (1752-1845); courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem
    • Liner Notes by George Emlen, Tony Barrand, and Jack McCreless

Top Index

For Friendship and for Harmony
The Fife Traditional Singing Weekend
image 
  • For Friendship and for Harmony
    • 2005 - Autumn Harvest AH003 CD

image  Show Details

image  Hide Details

  • Track List:
    1. Hairst o Rettie — Joe Aitken
    2. When I Wis New But Sweet Sixteen — Stanley Robertson
    3. The Butcher Boy — Elizabeth Stewart
    4. Ythanside — Jock Duncan
    5. Bold Princess Royal — Louis Killen
    6. I am Wearin Awa John — Chris Miles
    7. Up a Wild and Lonely Glen — Stanley Robertson
    8. Binnorie — Norman Kennedy
    9. Bogie's Bonnie Belle — Joe Aitken
    10. Ferretin' — John Malcolm
    11. The Cruel Mother — Elizabeth Stewart
    12. Guise o Tough — Jock Duncan
    13. When Fortune Turns the Wheel — Louis Killen
    14. Lakes o Shillin — Sheila Stewart
    15. Ellon Feeing Market — Joe Aitken
    16. Yowie wi the Crookit Horn — Elizabeth Stewart
    17. The Castlegate — Norman Kennedy

  • Credits
    • Recorded during the Fife Traditional Singing Festival, Collessie, Fife in May 2005

Notes

Songs and ballads recorded at the Fife Traditional Singing Weekend in May 2005. This was the third year of the event - a gathering of many of Scotlands finest exponents of the art held at the Fife Animal Park in Collessie, Fife.

The album opens with Joe Aitken of Kirriemuir singing the majestic north-east bothy ballad The Hairst o Rettie. Other songs include Ythanside from Jock Duncan, the ancient murder ballad of the Cruel Mother from Elizabeth Stewart and Stanley Robertson's version of When I Wis New But Sweet Sixteen. Norman Kennedy, the internationally renowned traditional singer originally from Aberdeen was a special guest at the event from his home in Vermont in the USA and here he sings the classic Scots ballad of Binnorie and the infamous Aberdeen song The Castlegate. The tyneside singer Louis Killen, recently returned to our shores after many years as a professional folk singer in the USA, sings the great nautical ballad Bold Princess Royal.

Louis Killen: Born and raised in Tyneside in a musical family of Irish/Scottish extraction, Louis was a founder member of the Newcastle Folk Club in 1958 and an original member of the High Level Ranters. He recorded several seminal albums with Topic in the 1960s and then emigrated to the USA where he continued a career in folk music, joining the Clancy Brothers between 1971 and 1976. Now back on home ground, Louis is recognised as one of the most knowledgeable singers and influential voices of the folk revival, noted in particular for his knowledge of shanties and maritime songs. Here he sings Bold Princess Royal (track 5), a famous song of piracy on the high seas, and a fine convivial song When Fortune Turns the Wheel (track 13), a line from which provides the title to this album.

Source: Springthyme Records

Top Index