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The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem
Discography: Compilations
Columbia LPs


Green In The Green
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  • Green In The Green
    • 1970 - Harmony H 30408 LP
  • The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem
    • 1971 - Hallmark SHM 729 LP (UK)

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  • Side One
    1. The Moonshiner [1]
    2. The Whistling Gypsy [1]
    3. Mountain Dew [2]
    4. Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye [2]
    5. Irish Rover [2]
  • Side Two
    1. Rocky Road To Dublin [3]
    2. The West's Awake [3]
    3. Green In The Green [4]
    4. The Leaving Of Liverpool [3]
    5. Whiskey, You're the Devil [2]

  • Credits
    • Cover design: Norman Zeef
    • Cover photo: Don Hunstsein

Sleeve Notes

I have listened to the music of The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem in the Florida Everglades, on the shore of Lake Ponchartrain, Louisiana, in Albuquerque, Tucson, on a hilltop near the LBJ Ranch, and in Aguascalientes, Mexico, but never in any place that faintly resembled Ireland.

Yet Makem and the Clancys, appearing here in a reissue of selections from several albums they made in the Sixties, always seemed to make themselves at home in those strange surroundings — and to understand how they did so is to understand their way of communicating something about tie special nature of Ireland.

They are, and always were, extremely Irish, with sweaters and everything, so Irish as to pass for an ethnic cliche. They always sing those rowdy, muscular songs you don't hear anywhere else (And why should you? The Clancy Brothers long ago formed the habit of roaming — er, roving — their native sod for authentic folk songs), songs about drinking and brawling and sailing and soldiering, usually against England, and of course becoming involved with the fair sex — songs of "rum, romance and rebellion," some forgotten scribe once wrote, although alliteration nicked the edge of truth; it is whiskey, not rum, that they sing about. That's a difference in alcoholic content of up to 20 per cent. Saints preserve us, as Mr. Keen's assistant used to say, on the face of it you would think you'd have to decorate your den to the specifications of a village pub for such music in its recorded form. On the contrary, it sounds right at home under a Texas sky on the banks of the much-mispronounced Pedernales River.

I happened to hear it there because back in the Sixties my wife and I taped a recording containing some of these very selections, along with a lot of other music, mostly classical, and took the tapes and an old recorder on a Volkswagen camper odyssey across the United States and Mexico. When we happened upon a campground with electrical outlets, we had music.

"The Leaving of Liverpool" made that trip. It is a classic, one of the handful of songs, out of all those in existence, that I never want to part with, and this arrangement of it is perfect. It isn't even about Ireland; Liverpool, as every Texas schoolboy knew intimately in those days, is decidedly English and was at the time the center of the rebirth of rock music. But a great many Irishmen worked at the Liverpool docks, back when the clipper ships were operating, and it was the isles' main docking point for trade with the Americas. The ship the song refers to, in fact, was a Yankee clipper, named "Davy Crockett." The girl being left behind is probably a Liverpool girl, but the Irish in the man singing the lament dominates the song. The arrangement sounds something like a forerunner to American bluegrass. The contrast between the delicate thread of the instrumental accompaniment and the robust, pub-brawling voices of the singers always grabbed me. The song, as sung here, has withstood my more or less constant exposure to rock in the last few years and is still in style. It complements the better rock arrangements I hear today and shames the others. I suppose it always will.

One other song I want to make special mention of is The West's Awake, which demonstrates what can be done with the awesome vocal power of a group like this. Tommy Makem's urgent, angry voice keys it, nothing pretty about the way he sings, thank goodness. The "west" refers to the western province of Connought which, geographically removed from England, was slow to shake off its apathy and join the revolt against English rule. The song chronicles the turn-about, when it comes, making a dramatic gear change near the end, as Connaught did, and soaring at the last like a battle cry, which it was.

That's a general picture of war, one of the romantic wars of the somehow less-dangerous past, but to get down to specifics, which are somewhat different, there's the hair-raising Johnny, I Hardly Knew Ye, which effectively neutralizes (devastates, if you prefer) its superficial counterpart When Johnny Comes Marching Home. Pat and Tom Makem introduced Mountain Dew to the Newport Folk Festival way back in 1959, and it, Irish Rover, Rocky Road to Dublin (believed to be an old Gaelic pipe tune, originally much slower), and the title song provide insight into other aspects of the traditional Irish outlook.

Ireland, of course, has wielded world-wide influence in every field from literature to politics out of all proportion to its significance as a piece of real estate. The little island, emerald or not, has dismal weather, a paucity of natural resources and soil that sometimes refuses to grow even potatoes, but it has literally charmed the world, for ages. It must have been the people, the spirit of the Irish people — and the spirit of the Irish people is so involved with the folk tradition that there's no separating them. That tradition, and therefore the essence of a great poor little country, is what this recording is about.

Noel Coppage
Contributing Editor, Stereo Review

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I'm A Free Born Man
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  • I'm A Free Born Man
    • 1972 - Harmony KH 31343 LP

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  • Side One
    1. God Bless England (Whack Fol The Diddle) [1]
    2. I'm A Free Born Man [4]
    3. The Leaving Of Liverpool [2]
    4. Lament For Brendan Behan [3]
    5. (Down By The Glen) The Bold Fenian Men [5]
  • Side Two
    1. A Medley Commemorating The 50th Anniversary Of The Uprising Of 1916: [4]
      1. Foggy Dew
      2. From Sean O'Casey's "Drums Under The Window"
      3. From W. B. Yeats' "Easter 1916"
    2. When We Were Under The King [4]
    3. Lord Nelson [4]
    4. Row, Bullies, Row [2]
    5. Gallant Forty Two [2]

  • Credits
    • Front cover photo: John Lewis Stage
    • Back cover photo: Don Hunstsein
    • © 1972 CBS, Inc./Manufactured by Columbia Records CBS

Sleeve Notes

Jay-sus, they took away our lands, our religion and our language; but they couldn't harness our tongues, so we sang about them, and we did it beautifully.

Brendan Behan
(from a conversation with the author, Dublin, 1963)


imageMusic to the Irish has always been more of a Declaration of Life than a mere branch of the Arts. Like the sun when it shines, music is not taken for granted. They do not treat it as just a supplement to their daily due; they embrace it as a complement to their very existence. Every shade of life is poured into their music-their joy, their grief, their loneliness and nostalgia, their love of God and freedom, even their casual acquaintance with the Devil ("Sure the poor man has to make a living too") -no subject is sacred and no man immune. When they were restricted, under penalty of death, to speak of liberty, they sang out in guise, loud and clear, of their love for Cathleen Ni Houlihan and their tolerance for John Bull, and somehow their pain was eased.

Because of the latter's suppression and discouragement, a complete catalog of Irish songs was never documented. The list of folk songs alone reportedly totals 5,000 and that does not include ceili instrumentals, traditional hymns, marching songs (one for every County), and local extemporaneous happenings, which on their own would frazzle the heads of most composers. The Irish have never been hard-pressed to turn any event into song-if itmovedand lookedslightly peculiar, they sang about it.

Throughout its hindered history Ireland has fostered a multitude of singers-turned-exiles who thankfully brought their music with them and passed it on from generation to generation. Consequently, no matter where you roam in the world today you're bound to run into her heirs, and on a good night, if pressed, they will share their legacy with you. They'll tell you about The Minstrel Boy and The Bard of Armagh (later adoptee in Nashville as The Streets of Laredo); then they'll move on to The Bold Fenian Men and the Gallant Forty Two; and bring you up to date with The Patriot Game and Derry's Bloody Sunday. In the process they may caress or cut each tale, but they will surround it with love and laughter, and if you listen well you will taste, touch, hear, smell, and see the quintessence of Ireland's past and present; and you will fully understand the dreams and rights of all Free Born Men.

-Shaun Considine

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The Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem
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  • The Clancy Brothers with Tommy Makem
    • 1977 - Columbia Special Products CSP P2 14279 LP

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  • Side One
    1. Wild Colonial Boy [3]
    2. Irish Rover [2]
    3. The Jolly Tinker [2]
    4. March Medley: [6]
      1. Boys From County Cork
      2. Let Erin Remember
    5. God Bless England [2]
    6. Green In The Green [8]
  • Side Two
    1. The Leaving Of Liverpool [5]
    2. Kelly The Boy From Killann [5]
    3. Nancy Whisky [7]
    4. Galway Races [7]
    5. Isn't It Grand Boys [7]
    6. Galway City [7]
  • Side Three
    1. Winds Of Morning [9]
    2. Holy Ground [3]
    3. Johnsons Motor Car [4]
    4. Patriot Game [4]
    5. The Parting Glass [4]
    6. A Jug Of Punch [4]
  • Side Four
    1. Wild Rover [6]
    2. Freedom's Sons [11]
    3. The Moonshiner [1]
    4. Brennan On The Moor [1]
    5. Tim Finnegan's Wake [1]
    6. Four Greenfields [10]

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The Best of the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem
Volume One
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  • The Best of the Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem - Volume One
    • 1980 - Harp HPE 620 LP

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  • Side One
    1. Holy Ground
    2. Jug of Punch
    3. Brennan on the Moor
    4. Singing Bird
    5. The Cobbler
  • Side Two
    1. I Tell My Ma
    2. Will Ye Go Lassie Go
    3. Marie's Wedding
    4. Rothsea-o
    5. Old Woman from Wexford

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The Best of the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem
Volume Two
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  • The Best of the Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem - Volume Two
    • 1980 - Harp HPE 625 LP

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  • Side One
    1. Irish Rover
    2. O'Donnel Abu
    3. Isn't it Grand Boys
    4. Courtin in the Kitchen
    5. The Rising of the Moon
  • Side Two
    1. Whiskey You're the Devil
    2. The 23rd of June
    3. The Wild Colonial Boy
    4. Shoals of Herring
    5. Bold O'Donahue

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Their Greatest Hits
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  • Their Greatest Hits
    • 1981 - CSP WEE 80009 LP

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  • Side One
    1. The Moonshiner [1]
    2. Brennan on the Moor [1]
    3. I'm A Free Born Man [4]
    4. Red Haired Mary [5]
    5. Finnegan's Wake [1]
    6. The Work of the Weavers [1]
    7. Young Roddy McCorley [1]
    8. Patriot Game [2]
  • Side Two
    1. Jug of Punch [1] or [2]
    2. Green In The Green [4]
    3. Reilly's Daughter [2]
    4. The Cobbler [3]
    5. Home Boys Home [6]
    6. Juice of the Barley [2]
    7. Isn't it Grand Boys [3]
    8. The Parting Glass [2]


Sleeve Notes

The sleeve notes for this album are the same as A Spontaneous Performance Recording.

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With Love From Ireland
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  • With Love From Ireland
    • 1986 - CSP P 18983 LP

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  • Track List:
    1. My Johnny Ladd [1]
    2. Work Of The Weavers [1]
    3. Brennan On The Moor [1]
    4. Irish Rover [2]
    5. Courtin In The Kitchen [2]
    6. Jug Of This [2]
    7. Whiskey You're The Devil [2]
    8. When I Was Single [2]
    9. God Bless England [2]
    10. Johnny I Hardly Knew Ye [2]
    11. They're Moving Father's Grave [5]
      Holy Ground [3]
    12. Tim Finnegan's Wake [1]
    13. Johnson's Motor Car [4]
    14. Reilly's Daughter [4]
    15. Jug Of Punch [4]
    16. Galway Bay [4]
    17. Children's Medley [4]

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